Team Wild TV » airguns http://www.teamwild.tv Wed, 10 Dec 2014 16:48:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.6.1 Air Arms S410 TDR Review http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/16757-air-arms-s410-tdr-review?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=air-arms-s410-tdr-review http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/16757-air-arms-s410-tdr-review#comments Fri, 08 Aug 2014 16:29:42 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=16757 Mention Take Down Rifle, and immediately snipers and assassins spring to mind. A dodgy looking individual with a briefcase and inside, a host of Read More

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Mention Take Down Rifle, and immediately snipers and assassins spring to mind.

A dodgy looking individual with a briefcase and inside, a host of parts and goodies all waiting to be assembled into a killing machine.

The Air Arms S410 TDR is no exception, apart from today, it’s not being assembled by a dodgy looking character! ;)

Lets have a closer look at this awesome little rifle.

What am I looking so happy for?...The Air Arms S410 TDR packs down into a handy back pack.

What am I looking so happy for?…The Air Arms S410 TDR packs down into a handy back pack.

A place for everything, and everything in its place!

A place for everything, and everything in its place!

The metal prongs on the rear of the stock align with points drilled into the rear of the breech.

The metal prongs on the rear of the stock align with points drilled into the rear of the breech.

Simply slide the two together.

Simply slide the two together.

And then rotate the knurled disc at the rear of the stock until it becomes tight.

And then rotate the knurled disc at the rear of the stock until it becomes tight.

The rear stock and fore stock are now held tightly.

The rear stock and fore stock are now held tightly.

It's starting to look a bit like a gun now. All that is left is to fit the silencer and load the mag ready for action. The gun weighs just over 6 lbs and balances really well. Freehand standing shots become easy.

It’s starting to look a bit like a gun now. All that is left is to fit the silencer and load the mag ready for action. The gun weighs just over 6 lbs and balances really well. Freehand standing shots become easy.

The silencer is held in place by a threaded screw. It pays to check this every 30 shots or so. The Silencer is lightweight and doesn't affect the guns balance at all.

The silencer is held in place by a threaded screw. It pays to check this every 30 shots or so. The Silencer is lightweight and doesn’t affect the guns balance at all.

The 10 shot magazine is incredibly easy to load. Perfect for night missions!

The 10 shot magazine is incredibly easy to load. Perfect for night missions!

The adjustable two stage trigger has a nice feel to it. I'm not a huge fan of the 'in the trigger safety catches' but this one works well and is effortless to knock off, it's also silent!

The adjustable two stage trigger has a nice feel to it. I’m not a huge fan of the ‘in the trigger safety catches’ but this one works well and is effortless to knock off, it’s also silent!

An easy to read built in manometer lets you know how much air you have left. You should have enough for 40 shots from a fill in both .22 and .177

An easy to read built in manometer lets you know how much air you have left. You should have enough for 40 shots from a fill in both .22 and .177

An accessory rail should you decide to tit a bi pod.

An accessory rail should you decide to tit a bi pod.

This is a neat touch. Two spare 10 shot magazines clip under the adjustable rear stock. This means you can load up for the night and just swap mags if the going gets hectic...The rats wont know what has hit them.

This is a neat touch. Two spare 10 shot magazines clip under the adjustable rear stock. This means you can load up for the night and just swap mags if the going gets hectic…The rats wont know what has hit them.

The screw cap reveals the tried and tested Air Arms filling system.

The screw cap reveals the tried and tested Air Arms filling system.

Comfortable and compact and made in Britain...What more could you ask for?

Comfortable and compact and made in Britain…What more could you ask for?

So there you have it, a super compact rifle that assembles in seconds with absolutely no loss of zero. The rifle is comfortable and accurate to shoot, and also gives a respectable 40 shots for such a compact unit. It might be small, but it packs a punch!

You and Air Arms, a winning combination!!

Click on this link to see the full range of Air Arms products.

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Benjamin Rogue .357 – Ballistics & Accuracy http://www.teamwild.tv/academy/15677-benjamin-rogue-357-ballistics-accuracy?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=benjamin-rogue-357-ballistics-accuracy http://www.teamwild.tv/academy/15677-benjamin-rogue-357-ballistics-accuracy#comments Tue, 13 May 2014 08:08:50 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=15677 International big game airgun hunter Ian Harford gets out onto the range to assess the accuracy and ballistic performance of the Benjamin Rogue .357 Read More

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International big game airgun hunter Ian Harford gets out onto the range to assess the accuracy and ballistic performance of the Benjamin Rogue .357 big bore air rifle ready for his big game hunting adventure to the USA, where he’ll be taking feral hogs, deer and hopefully a few other exotic game animals along the way.

This big bore behemoth of a gun is sure to deliver. Crosman have put a lot of research into building one of the worlds most powerful airguns….Powerful and accurate!

Click on this link for more information on the range of Crosman guns

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Night Vision Pigeon Hunt with a NiteSite NS200 http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/15654-night-vision-pigeon-hunt-nitesite-ns200?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=night-vision-pigeon-hunt-nitesite-ns200 http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/15654-night-vision-pigeon-hunt-nitesite-ns200#comments Mon, 12 May 2014 12:26:40 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=15654 It’s time for more airgun vermin control – this time with the trusty NiteSite NS200 and the awesome Benjamin Marauder in .25 calibre. Team Read More

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It’s time for more airgun vermin control – this time with the trusty NiteSite NS200 and the awesome Benjamin Marauder in .25 calibre.

Team Wild has been called in to deal some feral pigeons that are causing havoc in several barns.

With the NiteSite NS200 we can sneak up in the dead of the night and ambush them as they sleep. There’s no nook or cranny that can protect them from the Marauder!

Click this link for more information on the range of NiteSite products.

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EXTREME Airgun Hunting – Shooting Rats and Pigeons with the Daystate Huntsman .177 http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/13226-extreme-airgun-hunting-shooting-rats-pigeons-daystate-huntsman-177?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=extreme-airgun-hunting-shooting-rats-pigeons-daystate-huntsman-177 http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/13226-extreme-airgun-hunting-shooting-rats-pigeons-daystate-huntsman-177#comments Mon, 04 Nov 2013 09:16:44 +0000 Stacey Pawlak http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=13226 It’s the season for pest control and our vermin-busting duo are in the holiday spirit. With the cold weather approaching and farmers bringing their Read More

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It’s the season for pest control and our vermin-busting duo are in the holiday spirit. With the cold weather approaching and farmers bringing their livestock in for the season ahead, Big Steve with SPD Pest Control and Team Wild’s own, Steve “Wildy” Wild, have been called in to take care of some bothersome pigeons and rats mucking up the place. Wildy gets himself into some tight spaces but gets the job done with the help of some pretty amazing nighttime hunting kit; the NiteSite NS200 and the NiteSite Spotter.

Daystate Huntsman Classic in .177
http://tinyurl.com/n67bf64

Heym SR 21 Precision:
http://tinyurl.com/nl4tlu4

Hornady 50 gr V-MAX:
http://tinyurl.com/mfecklx

Swarovski Z6i Scope:
http://tinyurl.com/oly7sor

NiteSite NS200:
http://tinyurl.com/k7qnohj

NiteSite Spotter:
http://tinyurl.com/k7qnohj

Deerhunter Avanti Jacket & Trousers in Realtree Xtra Green
http://tinyurl.com/knt5cc3

A & M Custom Moderator:
http://tinyurl.com/nh3rbh2

Music: (Will Hyde) Closure Man
willhyde45@gmail.com

(Ekho Music) Modern Rock
http://tinyurl.com/pr5k6gy
http://tinyurl.com/ncrry46

(Ty Du Studio) The Fixed – Nice People
http://tinyurl.com/pnpvb6b

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EXTREME Airgun Hunting – Black Corsican Ram with the Benjamin Rogue http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/13159-airpower-black-corsican-ram?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=airpower-black-corsican-ram http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/13159-airpower-black-corsican-ram#comments Mon, 28 Oct 2013 09:14:25 +0000 Stacey Pawlak http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=13159 Big bore airgun hunting with the Benjamin Rogue .357 at the Texas Hunt Lodge. In this week’s Team Wild’s Air Power, Ian Harford is Read More

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Big bore airgun hunting with the Benjamin Rogue .357 at the Texas Hunt Lodge.

In this week’s Team Wild’s Air Power, Ian Harford is hunting sheep – a black corsican ram to be specific. This knarly old ram has a broken horn, which could cause serious damage to the other males when sparring. The old ram has enjoyed a long and fruitful life and needs to make way for the next generation to strengthen the gene pool and needs to be removed. Quiet, accurate and deadly, this is the perfect job for the Benjamin Rogue .357 big bore air rifle.

Benjamin Rogue .357
http://tinyurl.com/aswxhl

Vanguard Quest B62 Sticks
http://tinyurl.com/knt5cc3

Swedteam Creep Fleece Jacket in Realtree APG
http://tinyurl.com/knt5cc3

Zeiss Victory RF 10×45 Rangefinding Binos
http://tinyurl.com/knt5cc3

CenterPoint 4-16×56 Scope
http://tinyurl.com/pvt9cr3

Music:
(Will Hyde) Closure Man
willhyde45@gmail.com

(Ekho Music) Rock Clip
http://tinyurl.com/pegsd4w
http://tinyurl.com/ncrry46

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WFTF World Championship 2013: Shooting the Breeze – Part Three http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/12727-wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-three?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-three http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/12727-wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-three#comments Thu, 17 Oct 2013 08:11:39 +0000 Stacey Pawlak http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=12727 Welcome back to part three of Team Wild TV’s informative seven part series on the WFTF World Championship of 2013, held in Ebern, Germany. Read More

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Welcome back to part three of Team Wild TV’s informative seven part series on the WFTF World Championship of 2013, held in Ebern, Germany. Join us tonight for the first day of the shoot and witness the air of excitement that builds as the contestants prepare to struggle towards their goal of taking the championship home. In this film we’ll bring you the backstory of players and how they became involved in this fantastic sport.

Also be sure to watch out for Team Wales and their colourful banter as they bring light and humour to the family-like setting of the WFTF World Championship. John Costello certainly doesn’t seem to mind just like the majority of the sport don’t seem to mind talking about their weight.

If you haven’t had a chance to look into our earlier videos following the WFTF World Championship be sure to check out our playlist of our previous onsite coverage: http://tinyurl.com/odnrk6j

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WFTF World Championship 2013: Shooting the Breeze – Part Two http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/12531-wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-two?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-two http://www.teamwild.tv/video-2/12531-wftf-world-championship-2013-shooting-breeze-part-two#comments Wed, 16 Oct 2013 11:57:57 +0000 Stacey Pawlak http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=12531 Welcome back to part two of Team Wild TV’s informative seven part series on the WFTF World Championship of 2013, held in Ebern, Germany. Read More

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Welcome back to part two of Team Wild TV’s informative seven part series on the WFTF World Championship of 2013, held in Ebern, Germany. Tonights show will not only brush over the history of the field target championships of the past, the rules and regulations of the sport but also give you insight to the family-like attitude of the shooters onboard this year and their banter between one another which is humorous, to say the least.

It’s not just John Costello who is suffering through his travels with someone who he considers his good friend and fierce rival. Behind the scenes footage of this event brings you all the laughs and tension as we build up to the main event of this years WFTF main event.

If you haven’t had a chance to look into our earlier videos following the WFTF World Championship be sure to check out our playlist of our previous onsite coverage: http://tinyurl.com/odnrk6j

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A Tale Of Rabbit Shooting http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/9273-a-tale-of-rabbit-shooting?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=a-tale-of-rabbit-shooting http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/9273-a-tale-of-rabbit-shooting#comments Wed, 04 Sep 2013 11:17:25 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=9273 Rabbits have to be one of Team Wild’s favourite quarries. Rabbit shooting is one of the things that we all have fond memories of. Read More

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Rabbits have to be one of Team Wild’s favourite quarries. Rabbit shooting is one of the things that we all have fond memories of.

In the past the humble rabbit has presented us with a multitude of methods for harvesting this tasty treat.

Often understated, a healthy rabbit will provide a good dinner and the various ways of cooking them outweigh the methods of harvest by far!

As a youngster, my father would collect me from school on a Friday and we would head out to one if our permissions.

A line of snares would be laid and we would pick a few off with the rimfire, then return at first light to check the snares and with an army of ferrets we would go to work on the numerous burrows.

This was the norm for me as a young lad and most weekends were a blueprint of the one mentioned. As I got older and into my teens, I would head off on my own with airgun or shotgun in search of a few rabbits for the pot. The rabbits in my area of Scotland were plentiful back then and it seemed that no matter how hard we hit them, the rabbit population would bounce back to normal.

At a ripe old age if 40 something years I still get the buzz when I pick up the gun and head out after bunnies.

I feel that I owe a lot of my deer stalking skills to the good old rabbit. I had to get up close and personal back in the day with my old BSA Meteor .22 with trusty open sights. A silent, unseen stalk using the wind to your advantage was essential to get close enough to bag a rabbit and it remains the same nowadays when I’m out after deer.

Except nowadays I can afford to take the odd long shot thanks to the superb glassware available for my rifles.

The rabbits on our Team Wild grounds have taken a hammering in recent years though, and not necessarily by us.

We worked our grounds to allow us the opportunity of taking a decent bag when we visited a particular area but would then leave that ground undisturbed for a while so that the rabbit population would recover a bit.

The landowners were happy because as were moving around our permissions, they were seeing rabbits being removed on a regular basis.

It was all going well until a bad spell of weather combined with the dreaded myxomatosis kicked in and we found ourselves with a diminished rabbit population and were no longer able to fulfill our regular orders.

We pretty much stopped taking rabbits in these areas for about a year and instead concentrated on a few golf courses that we had permission on.

These were areas where we had to try and take as many rabbits as possible so we still managed to keep rabbit pie on the menu.. Just!

Even after a year of leaving the rabbits alone,the grounds never really recovered but we just changed tactics in order to enjoy what we do.

Instead of heading out in the back of the pick up armed with the uber accurate Rimfire Magic derived 10/22, we would head out on foot with a tin of Accupels and the Daystate Huntsman, and instead of bagging 50 rabbits we would bag 5 a piece … If we were lucky.

The challenge is still the same,if not harder.

We still get enjoyment from going out on this ground but the bags and plan of attack have changed.

We will keep it like this for another year on these grounds and see how the population recovers and if we feel the time is right, we will get back into the hot seat and start to take some big bags again.

I think it’s important for us as hunters to spot these ‘highs and lows’ and manage them appropriately and correctly in order to preserve our sport and our countryside.

The same principals can be applied to any of our quarry species from ducks to deer.

It might be down to yourself hitting them hard or Mother Nature upsetting the balance but the results will be the same, if you don’t want your ground to dry up… Manage it!

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Pigeon Shooting With The Daystate Huntsman Regal http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/8542-pigeon-shooting-with-the-daystate-huntsman-regal?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pigeon-shooting-with-the-daystate-huntsman-regal http://www.teamwild.tv/hunting/8542-pigeon-shooting-with-the-daystate-huntsman-regal#comments Wed, 28 Aug 2013 15:49:05 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=8542 Normally people with a rat, rabbit or pigeon problem call us out to farms and other permissions. So you can imagine my surprise when Read More

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Normally people with a rat, rabbit or pigeon problem call us out to farms and other permissions. So you can imagine my surprise when I received a frantic call from Wildy about some feral pigeons that had managed to get into his garages and outbuildings and do their thing all over the contents…He was not a happy bunny!

Due to the scorching weather. Yes, I said ‘scorching’. I opted to go for the casual look and head down to Wildy’s place in my shorts and T Shirt.

Most of our hunting is done in rural areas where camo is seen on a regular basis and no one bats and eye but we thought it best to play it safe in this case, even although the majority of folks in the village know Wildy.

We would also need to have the gun cased when walking from the car to the buildings, as we would have to park up in a nearby doctor’s surgery.

We had been given a new Daystate Huntsman Regal to test in .22 so all was good.

I headed over to Wildy’s place and got down to business, the very serious business of putting the kettle on and having a coffee before we did anything.

We sat in the sunshine drinking our brew and chatting about the job in hand, and it just felt bizarre, the two of us sitting in shorts, sunglasses on and about to go shooting.

Wildy told me that his worry would be that the pigeons would move on through the sheds and take up residence in the shed which currently houses his vintage Rolls Royces.

The Rollers are kept in a heated unit and are kept spotless so that they look good when out on the wedding jobs. You can imagine the chaos that a few well aiming pigeons could do!

Coffee break over and it was on to the Regal and put a few shots through it in the gardens just to make sure that it was still on target.

The gun was grouping perfectly but was around a half inch to the right.

When we scoped the gun in last time the weather couldn’t have been more different. Wind and rain, and cold to go with it.

With the windage adjusted, we put the Regal back in its case and headed out on the job, looking like we were off to the beach!

We headed out to the back of the sheds to see what we could do and immediately spotted one of the problems.

Pigeons had been taking up residence in a large open sided barn at the rear of the buildings and it looked as if they had built up quite a feathered community.

Quick as a flash, Wildy had the Regal out of the case and was loading up the 10 shot mag.

A good steady support from one of the metal girders supporting the barn and Wildy had the first feral pigeon of the day in the bag.

A good clean head shot ensured the bird just flopped to the ground and Wildy was scanning for another target.

The shot had made some of the pigeons at the other end of the barn take off, but they flew up and around in a big circle and were heading back to the sheds.

Two of them landed on the roof of the barn, so knowing that my shot would fall safe if missed I lined up on one of the feathery fiends.

It felt like an age before they stopped strutting around and moving their heads but one of them stopped long enough for me to squeeze a shot off, which whizzed straight past its head.

I could see the .22 pellet go whizzing past but instead of flying away they both just started to strut and flutter about. Clearly annoyed at our interference but not realizing they were in any danger.

Big mistake! It’s not very often that I miss twice and today was no exception.

The second shot struck true and connected with the side of its head and bowled my pigeon off the top of the barn and onto the ground.

I wandered over and fetched it from where it landed, an easy retrieve. I say ‘easy’ as my next retrieve was not to be quite so straightforward.

A woodpigeon flighted over the sheds and took up a branch in a nearby tree.

I could hear it cooing away but couldn’t see it from where I was so started to move around the side of the building to see if I could clock it.

A flash of white caught my eye and on closer inspection I made out the white collar of the woody.

Through a small gap in the leaves I could make out its head and neck and got into position for a long shot.

The pigeon kept it’s head fairly still and I drew the crosshairs onto it’s eye.

I then moved up 3 mildots to allow fro drop but didn’t allow for any windage as it was very still with hardly any breeze.

I made sure everything was perfect for this shot, no rushing and controlled my breathing and then just a light squeeze on the trigger.

The resulting crashing and fluttering through the branches was enough to let me know that my shot was good and the woody was down.

“You see that Wildy? What a shot eh?” I called over to the big guy.

“Yes mate, excellent shot, but I also see the sea of nettles and undergrowth that you are about to march through to pick it up” he shouted back laughing his head off.

“And you’ve got shorts on”, by now he was in hysterics!

Sure enough there stood what seemed to be the best crop of stinging nettles id seen in a long time between my bird and me.

I knew that I couldn’t leave it just in case I had wounded it.

I was pretty sure it would be stone dead but there was no way I was going to leave without my pigeon.

Time to bite the bullet, interestingly enough with this phrase it is thought that it is derived historically from the practice of having a patient clench a bullet in his or her teeth as a way to cope with the extreme pain of a surgical treatment without anesthetic back in the day, so I couldn’t really compare the two situations but I know for a fact that I was clenching my teeth when I began to wade through the viscous undergrowth.

Nettles seem to have become more viscous since I was a kid, maybe its just because I’m getting older but they were coming keen on my legs and all I could hear was Wildy laughing at me. I looked back and he was sat on the ground sunning himself

“I’ll get a picture of you when you get back mate” he laughed over at me …He was really loving this!

I got to the bottom of the tree and there was my bird, dead as a stone and belly up, so off I headed back through the nettle patch trying to pick out the route I had just taken, which of course I couldn’t and ended up finding some nice specimens of the thistle variety on my journey back.

I got back and sure enough, there was Wildy with the camera and a big grin.

“Smile” he laughed…and I tried!

I headed off to find a dock leaf to rub on my legs in an attempt to ease the stinging and Wildy took over on the shooting front.

Wildy reported the good news was that I had taken so long to get my pigeon that the birds had come round and landed again.

Some of them had gone into the building and he had seen where they entered so knew where to block up once we had done our job.

He headed off inside the building and I heard the very faint sound of the Daystate being fired, followed by a dull thud.

Sounded like Wildy had another.

I had a wander round to where Wildy was and he already lining up his next bird.

Another well-placed shot and he had both of the birds that had flown into the shed. He headed off up the old steps to claim his birds. A much easier retrieve!

It’s very important that you take time and know where and what you are walking on when in and around old buildings.

We knew the sheds like the back of our hands so knew the safe parts to walk on but some of the places we have been have presented what looked like perfectly safe platforms that have turned out to be very weak structures.

We always ask when on a job, what is and where is safe as the building contractor or owner knows these things.

The sheds used to be stables for the pub when it was a coaching Inn, so that gives you some idea of how old they are.

We have found the best way of removing ferals is to watch where they enter a building then take out as many of the birds as we can with the airguns and then block the holes up where they were coming in. We have found that this gets good results.

Back to me and I had spotted another woodpigeon, this one had landed on the barn roof so I knew this one was going to land in a friendly area if it dropped off the roof.

A steady shot from the side of one of the other sheds and the pigeon was plummeting toward the ground…and an easy retrieve!

We waited around for a bit, but the pigeons were becoming educated now.

There wasn’t that many birds in the first place but the ones that were left had seen their numbers dwindle and had decided to make other arrangements.

One more for Wildy from the barn roof and then we decided to call it a day. Wildy still laughing at my now VERY red legs.

We packed the birds into an old box that we had taken with us and would dispose of them later.

The gun went back into its case and we headed back to the car.

We had a bit of a surprise back at the car as the car park was now full with people getting ready to head off into the village for a walk, eating ice creams and chatting away without a clue as to what we had been doing…And that’s the way we like it.

I did learn though, that even a small job like this still called upon proper attire, whether it be camo or plain green, a pair of trousers and a long sleeved top is a necessity no matter if the sun is shining…..I learned the hard way!

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We Take A look Back At Awesome NiteSite NS200 http://www.teamwild.tv/gunroom/accessories/7202-we-take-a-look-back-at-awesome-nitesite-ns200?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=we-take-a-look-back-at-awesome-nitesite-ns200 http://www.teamwild.tv/gunroom/accessories/7202-we-take-a-look-back-at-awesome-nitesite-ns200#comments Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:02:52 +0000 Keith Anderson http://www.teamwild.tv/?p=7202 Being a part of Team Wild means that I am in the privileged position of seeing and using a lot of the ‘Gucci’ new Read More

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NiteSite 2-2

Being a part of Team Wild means that I am in the privileged position of seeing and using a lot of the ‘Gucci’ new accessories that are destined for the hunting market.

Some good and some bad but it’s not very often that all three of us are stopped dead in our tracks, marveling at a new piece of kit.

However this is exactly what happened when we first laid eyes on the new NS200 from the guys at NiteSite.

The concept of a night vision set up that doesn’t have to be re-zeroed when fitted and can be interchanged between rifles is awesome; this means it can be taken off my air rifle and fitted to my foxing rifle in minutes and as long as my scope and rifle set up is on, I’m good to go.

In fact it appealed to us so much, we now each have one as part of our standard hunting gear and I don’t think there has been a week since that the Nite Site hasn’t seen action.

I decided to use my one on the local rabbit population and arranged to meet up with Wildy for a night of bunny bashing.

We decided on hitting a local paddock that we knew had a few of the pesky critters in residence but we hadn’t been able to get at them due to there being a lot of activity and a few houses in the vicinity.

The owner of the ground wanted the rabbits moving and wanted it doing discreetly so we decided a night visit with the NS200 and the Daystates would fit the bill.

We arrived at the paddock and set the unit up on the tailgate of the truck.

I’ll not go into all of the technical data with the set up but can assure you that if I can manage it…..Anyone can manage it!

The Nite Site NS50 and NS200 are both identical to look at and come packaged exactly the same; the only difference being that the NS50 will provide a clear and shootable image out to 50 yards and the NS200 will go out to 200 yards.

The screen is fitted to the top of the scope via a bracket which clamps on to the scope tube, 2 sizes are provided for 30mm and 1” tubes.

Then a rubber tube fits snugly over the eye piece which becomes the housing for the camera unit which slides into place.

The battery then can be attached to the user’s belt or be carried in a pocket and a cable is connected from the battery to the camera unit,.

A cable from the screen unit also runs to the camera unit and that’s it! Switch on the screen and make a few tweaks to the position of the camera lens to ensure the crosshairs are crisp and clear and you are ready to hunt.

It takes a bit of getting used to and I would suggest a bit of practice on the range to allow familiarity with the new shooting position as the gun can still be in your shoulder but you are now looking over the scope with your head up and off the stock.

It is also advisable to utilise any natural features to use as a rest such as gateposts, walls etc if you do not have a bi pod fitted. Shooting sticks are also a good idea when using the NiteSite.

A scan of the field showed quite a few rabbits sat out in the field and a bright pair of eyes lurking in the hedge bottom at around 180 yards away.

We decided against giving it a squeak as Charlie would surely flush the rabbits in the field and sent them scurrying back to the hole infested ditch that they used as a refuge.

We crept in to the paddock with the Nite Site off and kept tight to the hedge and fence, keeping downwind of our quarry so as not to give the game away, then at about 35 yards away we rested the .177 Huntsman on the shooting sticks and quietly clicked the screen on to see what was out there.

At about 30 yards away a rabbit sat, totally oblivious to the fact that we were there, hunched up and chewing on a blade of grass which was about to be its last supper.

The tiny Rangemaster Li pellet struck behind the eye with deadly accuracy and the rabbit rolled on to its side and kicked its last.

A rabbit at about 20 yards further up the field had gone un-noticed by us and although not alerted by the report of the gun, it had heard the thrashing of its mate and decided to come and see what the fuss was about……. Big mistake.

We didn’t even have to move from position and drew a bead on the front of its skull, the Daystate gave a ‘phut’ and the next sound was the crack as the pellet struck true and provided another clean kill to the NiteSite.

Further on up the field and we adopted the same strategy but were disappointed this time when we switched the unit on to find the rabbits at the very edge of the field, dashing into cover. A scan into the filed showed the problem. Charlie was wandering through the field bold as brass and totally unaware of our presence as we followed him with the NiteSite.

At around 80 yards he provided an easy shot but not for my Daystate.

As soon as he walked down wind of us he could scent us and knowing something was wrong, headed out of the field at break neck speed, scattering our intended quarry as he went.

We went on to bag another 3 rabbits before deciding to call it a night which gave us enough to skin and butcher ready for the barbeque that weekend.

¾ grown rabbits, marinaded and cooked over coals with a few beers and good company, It doesn’t get much better than that.

Thanks NiteSite NS200 !

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